Tag Archives: Russian Literature

The Russian Language

Ivan Turgenev, The Russian Language (prose poem).

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In days of doubt, in days of sad brooding­ on my country’s fate, thou alone art my ­rod and my staff — oh great, mighty, true­ and free Russian tongue! But for thee, h­ow not to fall into despair, seeing all t­hat happens at home? Yet who can think th­at such a language is not given to a grea­t people? Continue reading The Russian Language

Fyodor Dostoyevsky “My Paradox” (Extract)

Fyodor Dostoyevsky in 1863.
Fyodor Dostoyevsky in 1863.

Again a tussle with Europe (oh, it’s not a war yet: they say that we – Russia, that is – are still a long way from war). Again the endless Eastern Question is in the news; and again in Europe they are looking mistrustfully at Russia. . . . Yet why we should go running to seek Europe’s trust? Did Europe ever trust the Russians? Can she ever trust us and stop seeing us as her enemy? Oh, of course this view will change someday; someday Europe will better be able to make us out and realize what we are like; and it is certainly worth discussing this someday; but meanwhile a somewhat irrelevant question or side issue has occured to me and I have recently been busy to solve it. No one may agree with me, yet I think that I am right – in part, maybe, but right. Continue reading Fyodor Dostoyevsky “My Paradox” (Extract)

Fyodor #Dostoyevsky on the #Slavic Question

Fyodor Dostoyevsky‘s Diary (1877, November).

Portrait of Fyodor Dostoyevsky by Vasily Perov, 1872.
Portrait of Fyodor Dostoyevsky by Vasily Perov, 1872.
Some Quite Special Remarks about the Slavs That I Intended to Make Long Ago.

Continue reading Fyodor #Dostoyevsky on the #Slavic Question

Letter by Fyodor #Dostoyevsky to Alexander III of Russia

Sergey Zaryanko - The Portrait of Grand Duke Alexander Alexandrovich in a court suit, 1867.
Sergey Zaryanko – The Portrait of Grand Duke Alexander Alexandrovich in a court suit, 1867.
A letter by Fyodor Dostoyevsky to Grand Duke Tsarevich Alexander Alexandrovich (future Emperor of Russia Alexander III). Continue reading Letter by Fyodor #Dostoyevsky to Alexander III of Russia

Ivan Krylov’s Fable “The Wolf and the Lamb”

Alexander Zudin - G1 + G7
Alexander Zudin – G1 + G7

Ivan Andreyevich Krylov, The Wolf and the Lamb.

Always are the weak at fault before the strong.

In history we hear a host of examples,

But history we are not writing:

Here is how they tell of it in Fables. Continue reading Ivan Krylov’s Fable “The Wolf and the Lamb”

#Dostoyevsky Is the Limit?!

Between Russianness & Dostoyevskiness

Dostoyevskiness © Sergey Armeyskov, 2014.Oh, dostoyevskiness of a flowing cloud!

Oh, pushkinities of mellow noon!

Night looks like Tyutchev,

Filling boundless with supernal.

Velimir Khlebnikov, 1908-1909.

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Apparently, Fyodor Dostoyevsky became a symbol, an archetype of a Russian writer, along with Lev Tolstoy (‘Tolstoyevsky’). Simplified image of Dostoyevsky’s Russia (or Dostoyevskian Russia) became a part of popular culture both in the West and in Russia. Continue reading #Dostoyevsky Is the Limit?!