Tag Archives: Russian Art

Exhibition of Ivan Aivazovsky

Ivan Aivazovsky - Manoeuvres of the Black Sea Fleet in 1849 (1886). Oil on canvas.
Ivan Aivazovsky – Manoeuvres of the Black Sea Fleet in 1849 (1886). Oil on canvas.

This Thursday I’ve finally visited the exhibition of Ivan Aivazovsky (1817-1900) in the Tretyakov Gallery devoted to the 200th anniversary of his birth. Continue reading Exhibition of Ivan Aivazovsky

#RussianProverb: Do Not Saw Off the Branch You Are Sitting On

Alkonost (lubok), the end of the 18th c - beginning of the 19th c.
Alkonost (lubok), the end of the 18th c – beginning of the 19th c.

Не пили сук, на котором сидишь

(ne pilí suk, na kotórom sidísh).

Continue reading #RussianProverb: Do Not Saw Off the Branch You Are Sitting On

Velimir Khlebnikov — Untitled (Things Got Scattered Out of the Bag)

Kazimir Malevich Black Square White on White
Kazimir Malevich – Black Square, between 1920s-1930s (The State Hermitage Museum); White on White, 1918 (MoMA).

Continue reading Velimir Khlebnikov — Untitled (Things Got Scattered Out of the Bag)

#RussianSaying: What the Eyes Fear, the Hands Do

Nicholas Roerich - The Himalayas (Medley)
Nicholas Roerich – The Himalayas (Medley)

Глаза боятся – руки делают (glazá boyátsya – rúki délayut).

Literally: eyes fear [but] hands do, i.e. Continue reading #RussianSaying: What the Eyes Fear, the Hands Do

#RussianProverb: It’s Better to See Once than to Hear a Hundred Times

The painting by Ivan Bilibin called "Buyan Island" (1905) made as an illustration for Alexander Pushkin's tale "The Tale of Tsar Saltan" (1831).
The painting by Ivan Bilibin called “Buyan Island” (1905) made as an illustration for Alexander Pushkin’s tale “The Tale of Tsar Saltan” (1831).

Лучше один раз увидеть, чем сто раз услышать (luchshe odin raz uvidet’, chem sto raz uslyshat’), i.e. it’s better to see [something] once than to hear [about it] a hundred times.

English equivalents:

  • seeing is believing;
  • a picture is worth a thousand words.

#RussianProverb: A Bird Is Known by Its Flight

Aleksey Savrasov - The Rooks Have Come Back, 1871.
Aleksey Savrasov – The Rooks Have Come Back, 1871.

Видна птица по полёту (vidná ptítsa po polyótu).

Literally: a bird is known by its flight.

Continue reading #RussianProverb: A Bird Is Known by Its Flight