#RussianIdiom: To Wait for the Good Weather by the Sea


Ivan Aivazovsky - Among the waves, 1898.
Ivan Aivazovsky – Among the waves, 1898.

Ждать у моря погоды (zhdat’ y mórya pogody).

Literally: to wait for the [good] weather by the sea.

Explanation: to wait for something to happen without any effort.

Ivan Aivazovsky - The Black Sea, 1881.
Ivan Aivazovsky – The Black Sea, 1881.

English equivalents:

  • to wait for the world to beat a path to your door;
  • to let the grass grow under one’s feet;
  • to whistle for a wind.
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2 thoughts on “#RussianIdiom: To Wait for the Good Weather by the Sea

  1. Now this is a really interesting saying. I’m also wondering if there might not be another meaning. Waiting for weather by the sea – where there is always much changeable weather, could it not also mean those people who wait pointlessly for things – like Uncle Vanya for instance, doing nothing but waiting for someone to recognise his true worth, when it is never going to happen. And in the meantime doing little to demonstrate that he has merit anyway.
    Then it could also mean waiting for the right weather – ie the right conditions to embark on a mission. I love all the shades of ambiguity in this simple phrase.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You described the ‘shades of ambiguity’ perfectly. Speaking of literary associations, I think this idiom could be Oblomov’s motto. P.S. I’ll post another saying soon which is sort of contrary to this one.

      Liked by 1 person

Any ideas?

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